Andy Warhol Highlights Conservation.. TODAY.

‘Siberian Tiger from Endangered Species’ [1983] by Andy Warhol, Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board, 38″ x 38″.

Thirty four years ago as a distance of Earth time can be viewed quite differently depending upon your perspective.

In the universal scheme of things it’s a blip of light.  The prehistoric warming of our life-supporting planet helped our atmosphere to form.

Cup your hands together, place your hands over your mouth and breathe outwards.

A gaseous dome slowly appeared as a refractive curvature around the cooled Earth crust.  Physically speaking Time represents a slingshot, as far as one can understand its concept.

Whilst quantifying vast universal distances we are technically measuring things with a supermassive curved ruler.  If you threw measuring tape across a room to gauge its length you would land at a reasonable estimate.

Throw measuring tape to the outer universe and even with the best will in the world, very strange things are going to happen as regards Time and Relative Dimensions in Space.

Think of our sea with its known pathways and currents throughout its depths.

Then imagine the Universe with all its contained masses conveyed at varying speeds according to their ebb and flow.

Linearity becomes a distinct calculative problem.

‘Pine Barrens Tree Frog from Endangered Species’ [1983] by Andy Warhol, Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board, 38″ x 38″.

Amphibians are amongst the coolest of animals, particularly growing up, myself, as a child of learning.  Just as otters, honey badgers and dolphins are natural comedians.

Amphibians look kind of extraterrestrial in a mostly pleasant way.

Andy Warhol’s conservation screenprints, four of ten shown here, should be recognised as an artistic yardstick to amplify progress.

Propensity and discombobulation.

The ‘Pine Barrens Tree Frog from Endangered Species’ clings on, above.

‘African Elephant from Endangered Species’ [1983] by Andy Warhol, Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board, 38″ x 38″.

There can be no doubting that Andy Warhol is the King of Pop Art.

Shown above, ‘African Elephant from Endangered Species’ cleverly depicts a reduced landscape to emphasize scale.

‘San Francisco Silverspot from Endangered Species’ [1983] by Andy Warhol, Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board, 38″ x 38″.

Would not all things appear too monochromatic without the ‘San Francisco Silverspot from Endangered Species’ by the popular artist?

We can make art in order to transport us toward positive change and to affect.

“They Always Say Time Changes Things.  But You Have To Actually Change Them Yourself.” – Andy Warhol.

http://warholfoundation.org/

I think this article highlights that the power of truly heartfelt emotive art should never die.

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